Transits

material culture, migration and everyday life

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TRANSITS Survey

 

 

 

Dear followers

TRANSITS is spreading a survey to Portuguese citizens residing in Berlin, Sydney and Luanda, and to German, Australian and Angolan citizens residing in Lisbon.

We would like to ask your collaboration for filling and distributing the survey.

Portugueses in Berlin, Sydney and Luanda –  https://ics.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_7ZCzCWesL3sgg3r

 Angolans in Lisbon –  https://ics.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_eyC04XZKXxu8Q2F

 Australians in Lisbon –  https://ics.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2memDykHHXxTVHL

Germans in Lisbon –  https://ics.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3slwydeMYoQKGdn

Only complete surveys will be considered valid. Participation is anonymous and data will be handled and used exclusively by researchers of the TRANSITS team.

TRANSITS focuses on present-day bidirectional movements of people and things between Lisbon, Luanda, Berlin and Sydney. The survey seeks to know people under those movements, their trajectories, expectations, migratory projects, and their relationships with the contexts of departure and arrival. Being an innovative research project, it is important that TRANSITS survey reaches as many people as possible in order to be faithfully to people’s lives and voices.

TRANSITS team is available for any further questions or additional information through email: transits.ics.ul@gmail.com

Thank you for your time!

TRANSITS team,

 

Angola identity card: some emigration and immigration indicators

According to the UN, Angola would have in 2015 about 555 thousand emigrants residing abroad. The number corresponds to 1.9% of the Angolan population. The same source indicates that the Angolans emigrated especially to the neighbor Democratic Republic of the Congo (33%) and Portugal (27%). If the case of DRC, since long time ago, the populations of the north of Angola circulate between the two sides of a boundary forced by the colonization. With Portugal the historical relations involve different phases and a complex and dynamic colonial past.

Angola has been assuming itself as a regional power in the context of Sub-Saharan Africa. Since 2002, with the end of the civil war, the country has attracted immigrants with different socio-professional, economic and cultural profiles. The UN data have registered the presence of 106,845 immigrants in Angola for the year 2015, equivalent to only 0.4% of the population of the destiny country. In a vast context of globalized migratory flows, they found among the three most represented nationalities: DRC (40%), Portugal (15%) and Cape Verde (10%).

Comparing the countries analyzed in the project (Portugal, Germany, Australia), Angola is the one with the fewest number of entrances and exits of migratory movements.

Conferência Transits:

Who is Portugal in the geography of contemporary migrations?

Like other European countries Portugal has a long history of emigration dating back to the colonial past. Immigration, in turn, is a relatively recent phenomenon. After immigration, beginning in 1974, had overcome emigration for almost three decades there has been a growing migration deficit since the mid-2000s. In other words, at levels that are only parallel to the population movements of the 1960s and 1970s.

According to the UN, Portugal presented na emigration rate of 22.1% against an immigration rate of 8.1%, being the origin of migrations to countries with more stable economies in Europe – the United Kingdom, Switzerland and Germany – and the destination of migrations originating in Cape Verde, Romania and Brazil. Considering the four countries analyzed in the project, Portugal not only has the highest percentage of exits but also distances a lot from the others (4.9%; Australia 2.2%; Angola: 1.9%). The same source indicates that among the total number of portuguese emigrants (2 306 321), 4% lived in Germany (98 464), 1% in Australia (20 044) and 1% in Angola (15 528). UN data indicate the presence of 837,257 immigrants in Portugal, in 2015, among which Angolans represent 18% of the flows (151,273), Germans 3% (26,048) and Australians 0.1% (1 164) only.

Portugal: one of the EU countries with fewer immigrants

Among countries of the European Union (EU 28) Portugal stays at the twenty-first place, with just 3.8% of foreign residents between population (Observatório das Migrações).

In the context of the european crisis of recent years, where effects of economic and labor contractions were more pronounced in Portugal than in many other countries of the EU, Portugal has registered successive decreases in the number of foreigners living in the country. However, from 2015, according to Eurostat values, not only did the number of foreigners resident in Portugal has been growing again (figure 1), as the structure of the ten most representative nationalities has also changed (figure 2).

Gráfico 1: International migrations (permanent movements) from and to Portugal, 2006-2016

Chart elaborated by the project “Transits” based on Eurostat values, Database on Population and Social Conditions, Demography and Migration (pop).

Despite the reduction registered in relation to 2015 (- 1.6%) Brazil has remained the most expressive nationality in 2016, representing 20.4% of the total number of foreign residents in Portugal. After Brazilians, there are the Cape Verdeans (9.2%), the Ukrainians (8.7%), the Romanians (7.7%) and the Chinese (5.7%) which have grown 5.5% compared to the previous year.

Gráfico 2: Top representative nationalities of foreigners residing in Portugal

Chart elaborated by the project “Transits” based on data from SEF.

On the other hand, there have been more and more citizens from European Union countries choosing Portugal to live. The French registered a growth of 33.8% compared to 2015, and in 2016 they were in ninth place (2.8%) ahead of the spanishs (2.8%). In its turn, the United Kingdom was in sixth place (4.9%), with growth of 12.5%, supplanting Angola (4.3%) and Guinea Bissau (3.9%).Acquisitions of portuguese nationals of non-EU citizens are one of the responsible for the registered changes.

Portugal: the country of the European Union with more emigrants around the world.

Human migrations present today new routes and configurations, which contributes to their increasing visibility and diversity. In 2015, the number of international immigrants was 243 million, corresponding to 3.3% of the global population. Although the number of international migrants has increased in the past recent decades, their relative weight on the world population continues to be discrete (from 2.3% to 3.3% between 1965 and 2015).

Portuguese (%) in the top 15 host countries

Map elaborated by the project “Transits” based on data from United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2015).

According to the UN, Portugal would have in 2015 approximately 2.3 million emigrants, who represent 0.9% of the total number of world emigrants for that year. Considering that the weight of the Portuguese population in the world population is 0.14%, Portugal presents a sevenfold increase concerning the number of emigrants. This makes of Portugal the country of the European Union with more emigrants in proportion to its resident population[1]. According to the same source, there are five main host countries that account for 68% of the Portuguese emigrants: France (31%), the USA (17%), Switzerland (9%) and Canada (7%). The remaining 32% are distributed around Spain (5%), the United Kingdom (4%), Germany (4%), Luxembourg (4%), Venezuela (2%), South Africa %), Australia (1%), Netherlands (1%) and Angola (1%).

[1] Considering only the countries with more than one million inhabitants.

Transits in the media

Check the latest news in Marta Rosales’s interview  in “90 seconds of science” (8/05/2017), in witch she explains the potential of material culture as a lens to explore contemporary migration and belonging.

Ep. 120 Marta Vilar Rosales – Analisar objetos trazidos por migrantes para estudar como as pessoas se relacionam com os seus países de origem

Transits Blog

Transits blog is a research blog that has the main goals of disseminating and highlighting scientific informations and outcomes concerning the ongoing project as well as events and publications related to the topics under study (find more).

This project aims to study the material dimensions of contemporary migrations. It will investigate how and to what extent contemporary material culture and consumption practices are implicated in the expectations, imaginaries and experiences of presentday movements of people from and to Portugal. It will focus on recent movements from Lisbon to three contexts Luanda, Melbourne and Berlin, and on the movements originating in the same contexts to Lisbon.

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