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material culture, migration and everyday life

Portuguese in Australia: about half of the Portuguese-born population lives in Greater Sydney

In 2016, the majority of Australians continue to live in the eastern mainland states. Approximately 77% lived in New South Wales (32%), Victoria (25%) and Queensland (20%) (Census, 2016). New South Wales was still the most popular state or territory to live in 2016 for Australia’s overseas-born population (34%), including the Portuguese (53%).

Place of Usual Residence (States)

Chart elaborated by the project “Transits” based on data from Australian Bureau of Statistics – Census 2016

The first movement of Portuguese migrants occurred during the 1950s mainly from Madeira Island towards Fremantle in Western Australia. Since then, Perth and Western Australia, in general, have been a frequent destination for Portuguese students and skilled labour which explains the higher presence of this group in this state compared to Australian and overseas-born population as a whole.

Portuguese – Year of Arrival in NSW, Australia (ranges)

Chart elaborated by the project “Transits” based on data from Australian Bureau of Statistics – Census 2016.

In 2016, the majority of Portuguese migrants continue to live in NSW (53%), of which 82% were living in the greater Sydney area. Most of them arrived in the state during between 1966-1975 (39%) and have continued to arrive in the following decades: 1976-1985 (18%) and 1986-1995 (21%). During the turn of the century, the arrival of Portuguese migrants has decrease sharply (3,7%). However, in the middle of the first decade of the XXI century, the arrival of Portuguese has increased again (10%). The recent and significant increase of the Portuguese population in New South Wales is evident and crucial for our research, opening new questions about the configuration, projects and aspirations of this newcomers. 

2 Comments

  1. Very nice article, exactly what I needed.

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